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Author Topic: Space Thread  (Read 167260 times)

SomeStupidGuy

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #30 on: November 06, 2013, 08:03:48 pm »

I think I'll post to watch, seeing as this thread is probably going to be filled with things that make me go 'ooh, neat.', and that's never a bad thing.
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alway

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #31 on: November 06, 2013, 09:18:34 pm »

SpaceX has the best web designers: http://www.spacex.com/dragon
Their website is fun to use to learn about their rockets. You want good PR? Hire a good web designer. Because, seriously.

Additionally, they're well on their way to reusable rockets. The Grasshopper tests have got a lot of press recently, basically being giant tests for the stuff for a controlled re-entry. Beyond that, they've now had a flight of their Falcon 9 V1.1, which is very close to the Falcon 9-R, their reusable specs. In that V1.1 flight, documented here: http://www.spacex.com/news/2013/10/14/upgraded-falcon-9-mission-overview
they restarted the first stage engines (twice) as they fell back down to earth, coming pretty close to the controlled re-entry required for reuse.
Quote
The stage ended up spinning to a degree that was greater than we could control with the gas thrusters on board and ultimately we hit the water relatively hard.   

However, SpaceX recovered portions of the stage and now, along with the Grasshopper tests, we believe we have all the pieces to achieve a full recovery of the boost stage.
So expect reusable rockets pretty soon.


Aside from SpaceX, the other big one to watch will be Bigelow Aerospace. They have a terrible website. http://www.bigelowaerospace.com/
They are also contracted to create a new ISS module, BEAM.

Their thing is inflatable spacecraft/modules which are cheaper, easier to launch, and safer than solid metal spacecraft like those making up the ISS. Once in orbit, they deploy to their full size, making them much more of a true space craft than the tin can designs necessitated by atmospheric traversal.

They've also floated plans for private spacestations; though these have been delayed due to delays in the private space launch ventures. But in any case, contracts with both United Launch Alliance and SpaceX do exist to start putting one in orbit in the next couple years. They also already have sent two of their earlier test modules into orbit, the Genesis I and Genesis II, which were launched in '06 and '07. Their more modern module design is the BA 330.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2013, 09:50:19 pm by alway »
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WillowLuman

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #32 on: November 06, 2013, 09:38:24 pm »

One thing I hope for is that space will eventually become reachable to more than just the rich, within my lifetime. Right now, only very resource-endowed entities like governments and corporations can afford to develop in this field, but this is an improvement from only superpowers having the necessary resources, and with further advances, perhaps one day space will become accessible to the common person.
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alway

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #33 on: November 06, 2013, 10:27:46 pm »

I personally would like to visit space; and since I'm a bachelor with a pretty good future career lined up, it may well happen. Even with Virgin Galactic, going to space is still about the same cost as raising a single child to the age of 18. Which kind of gives a whole new interpretation to the name Virgin Galactic. ;D

However, I don't really want to go to space on any long-term basis. Space sucks. Space sucks so hard that your blood boils as it freezes, knocking you unconscious within about 10 seconds, and starting permanent brain damage in 30.

You're stuck in a tiny tin can, whether you're on the surface or in the void, your ping time would be in the hours, with download speeds capable of giving you wet dreams about dial-up. You're eating terrible food optimized to weigh as little as possible, living in smelly quarters which can't be aired out, wearing underwear until the reeking tatters are deemed fit only to be burned. And if you're in space, you're even crapping into a vacuum cleaner. You're stuck in a tiny room with the same people for however long you're going to be there, and at risk of going mad on several fronts. And that's only if things go well.
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WillowLuman

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #34 on: November 07, 2013, 12:50:50 am »

But you also get Zero G. Introverted Shut-ins might not mind so much, and people on the ISS actually get fairly good wireless connection most of the time.
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10ebbor10

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #35 on: November 07, 2013, 04:16:55 am »

I personally would like to visit space; and since I'm a bachelor with a pretty good future career lined up, it may well happen. Even with Virgin Galactic, going to space is still about the same cost as raising a single child to the age of 18. Which kind of gives a whole new interpretation to the name Virgin Galactic. ;D

However, I don't really want to go to space on any long-term basis. Space sucks. Space sucks so hard that your blood boils as it freezes, knocking you unconscious within about 10 seconds, and starting permanent brain damage in 30.
Meh, Virgin Galactics "space" flights aren't really worth the name. They barely get there, after all.

Also; the explosive decompression thingy is false. Your blood doesn't boil nor freezes (human body is pretty good at maintaining pressure) and if you take adequate measures (don't hold your breath) you can survive in space till you suffocate. Approx 2 minutes before losing conciousness, IIRC.

You do have a pretty good chance of dieing from decompression effects afterwards though.

Olympic torch going to space
« Last Edit: November 07, 2013, 04:35:03 am by 10ebbor10 »
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10ebbor10

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #36 on: November 07, 2013, 09:14:37 am »

Wiki suggests 15 seconds, but yup, you're right. Forgot to take account of the fact that when exposed to pure vacuum, the lungs actually start scrubbing oxygen from your blood, rather than stop working.

On a side note, that assumes almost instantaneous decompression. Which is unlikely to happen in both a spacesuit or a spacecraft.
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Gentlefish

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #37 on: November 07, 2013, 09:32:50 am »

Well no. It's only the difference of one atmosphere. Explosive decompression happens only with multiple atmospheres of pressure. So you'll lose your air quick but you'll live.

Again, it's another case of the resilient human body, and how much pressure one atmosphere really is when compared to the tensile strength of human skin.. You'd stay inside the suit.

moreinfoedit: You'd swell a little bit, but the hypoxia will kill you. Or, if you held your breath, your lungs would pop.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2013, 09:35:01 am by Pufferfish »
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Guardian G.I.

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #38 on: November 07, 2013, 09:38:24 am »

Posting to watch, in the name of Yuri Gagarin.
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10ebbor10

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #39 on: November 07, 2013, 09:40:28 am »

Additionally, if there's a large hole, I'm pretty sure that the thing that created the hole would 've killed you too.

The only experience we have with those accidents is the Progress M-34 mission, which crashed into Mir during a failed test (which was to see if it was feasible to dock without the Kurs automated guidance system.) The Spektr module was punctured and sealed of permanently, but the depressurization took a while. The station lost aprox 10% of it's pressure before the module could be sealed off. (Which took a while as various powerlines had to be cut through.)
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WillowLuman

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #40 on: November 07, 2013, 01:44:33 pm »

If we could just solve that pesky atrophy problem, little orbital "appartment" modules could ease crowding. Even better with closed-loop life support.
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10ebbor10

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #41 on: November 07, 2013, 01:50:18 pm »

Crowding where? On earth. Building, launching and sustaining an orbital habitat will cost significantly more resources than just housing them on Earth would.

Also, artificial gravity is a thing.
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MetalSlimeHunt

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #42 on: November 07, 2013, 01:53:28 pm »

What I want is more experimentation with the centrifugal bed idea. If that is sufficient to maintain bone density, the microgravity problem is mostly solved.
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Drakale

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #43 on: November 07, 2013, 03:05:58 pm »

One could build 2 stations linked by a long tether cable and have them orbit one another to solve the microgravity issue. The cable would have to be strong enough to hold everything together or someone is gonna have a bad day.
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MetalSlimeHunt

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Re: Space Thread
« Reply #44 on: November 07, 2013, 03:11:15 pm »

If you're going to do that, you might as well just build a torus station.
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Quote from: Thomas Paine
To argue with a man who has renounced the use and authority of reason, and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like administering medicine to the dead, or endeavoring to convert an atheist by scripture.
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No Gods, No Masters.
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