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Author Topic: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)  (Read 11764 times)

WordsandChaos

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #30 on: February 16, 2015, 01:52:44 pm »

So who's the first to try the epic riddle poem?

" A poetic riddle intended to complain about a chosen subject, originating in The Seducer of Webs. The poem is divided into two distinct parts: five ten-line stanzas and seven to nine quatrains. Use of metaphor and vivid imagery is characteristic of the form.
The first part concerns the past. The tenth line of each stanza uses the same placement of allusions as the first line. It has lines with three feet with an accent pattern of stressed-unstressed-stressed (qualitative cretic trimeter). The ending of each line of this part rhymes with each other.
The second part concerns current events. Certain lines use the same placement of allusions. It has lines with three feet with an accent pattern of stressed-unstressed (qualitative trochaic trimeter). The ending of each line of this part rhymes with each other."

That's quite the riddle...
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 01:56:14 pm by WordsandChaos »
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Keshire

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #31 on: February 16, 2015, 01:57:37 pm »

These descriptions are awesome. I love the comments on stanza, metre, syllabic counts, and the other technical poetic structure/form detail. It's impressive how varied the styles get. Generator has a surprising love of tercets and assonance. So many speak stanzas in the style the serpent.

"The ending of every line of the poem rhymes with every other." - Does this mean it's using an alternating rhyme scheme or more: ABCBDBEB etc?

The latter. Every line has the same ending Rhyme.

So who's the first to try the epic riddle poem?

" A poetic riddle intended to complain about a chosen subject, originating in The Seducer of Webs. The poem is divided into two distinct parts: five ten-line stanzas and seven to nine quatrains. Use of metaphor and vivid imagery is characteristic of the form.
The first part concerns the past. The tenth line of each stanza uses the same placement of allusions as the first line. It has lines with three feet with an accent pattern of stressed-unstressed-stressed (qualitative cretic trimeter). The ending of each line of this part rhymes with each other.
The second part concerns current events. Certain lines use the same placement of allusions. It has lines with three feet with an accent pattern of stressed-unstressed (qualitative trochaic trimeter). The ending of each line of this part rhymes with each other."

That's quite the riddle...

I'm picturing a rap about Kobolds stealing gold, by Urist McSlim Shady...

I'm almost tempted to give it a go. :)
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 02:03:05 pm by Keshire »
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Untelligent

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2015, 02:41:47 pm »

So who's the first to try the epic riddle poem?

" A poetic riddle intended to complain about a chosen subject, originating in The Seducer of Webs. The poem is divided into two distinct parts: five ten-line stanzas and seven to nine quatrains. Use of metaphor and vivid imagery is characteristic of the form.
The first part concerns the past. The tenth line of each stanza uses the same placement of allusions as the first line. It has lines with three feet with an accent pattern of stressed-unstressed-stressed (qualitative cretic trimeter). The ending of each line of this part rhymes with each other.
The second part concerns current events. Certain lines use the same placement of allusions. It has lines with three feet with an accent pattern of stressed-unstressed (qualitative trochaic trimeter). The ending of each line of this part rhymes with each other."

That's quite the riddle...


The best part is that you need to rhyme 50 lines together and then at least another 28. Might be easier in Spanish than in English.
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The World Without Knifebear A much safer world indeed.
regardless, the slime shooter will be completed, come hell or high water, which are both entirely plausible setbacks at this point.

Novel Scoops

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2015, 04:25:23 pm »

I'm picturing a rap about Kobolds stealing gold, by Urist McSlim Shady...

I'm almost tempted to give it a go. :)

Please Armok! :D

RPS beat us to it! SHAME- oh wait praise be to iucounu!

Quote from: iucounu
OK I stretched my lunch hour by 5 minutes to complete the hunting-riddle of the Icy Nightmares (second one, above):

Frontier forlorn;
Austere, forsworn;
With bands of horn
And spikes adorn
This icy bourne.

No ox to spear;
No stag, nor deer;
No hoof beats near:

Quarry-riddle.


A poetic riddle concerning the hunt, originating in The Icy Nightmares. The poem is divided into three distinct parts: a quintain, a tercet and a line. It is always written from the perspective of the author. Use of consonance and vivid imagery is characteristic of the form. Forms of parallelism are common throughout the poem, in that certain lines often contrast underlying meaning and they have similar grammatical structures.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 04:35:04 pm by Novel Scoops »
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Kamamura

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2015, 07:16:01 pm »

A rotund official in a rich dress, all menacing with spikes of platinum and gypsum, forces his way through the madly rhyming crowd, emits a wet cough, and proclaims:

"The annual Rotten pumpkin award goes to Adraigs029 for his daring piece of structurally challenged koboldery. It's been unanimously found quite awful, but in a cheerful, heart-warming, dwarfy sort of way. The accompanying prize of two hundred barrels of rotgut beer can be picked up at the warehouse in the Maze of Gloves. Thank you"
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The entire content consists of senseless murder, a pile of faceless naked women and zero regard for human life in general, all in the service of the protagonist's base impulses. It is clearly a cry for help from a neglected, self absorbed and disempowered juvenile badly in need of affectionate guidance. What a sad, sad display.

Kamamura

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #35 on: February 16, 2015, 07:17:01 pm »

"Move along, nothing to see here..."
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The entire content consists of senseless murder, a pile of faceless naked women and zero regard for human life in general, all in the service of the protagonist's base impulses. It is clearly a cry for help from a neglected, self absorbed and disempowered juvenile badly in need of affectionate guidance. What a sad, sad display.

Zarathustra30

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #36 on: February 17, 2015, 12:34:21 am »

Quote
A solemn poetic form intended to make an apology, originating in The Shins of Intricacy. The poem is a single couplet. Each line has six syllables. Every line of the poem has a medial caesura. The first line concerns the past. The second line concerns the future.

I am (beat) very sorry.
It won't (beat) happen again.


Best recited in the voice of William Shatner.

Edit: And another!
I have (beat) banged your sister.
Rejoice! (beat) You're an uncle!
« Last Edit: February 17, 2015, 12:50:44 am by Zarathustra30 »
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How did we pass from inns with merry songs and happy music to temples of doom and medieval torture with so much easiness and eagerness??

Adragis

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #37 on: February 17, 2015, 01:33:53 pm »

A rotund official in a rich dress, all menacing with spikes of platinum and gypsum, forces his way through the madly rhyming crowd, emits a wet cough, and proclaims:

"The annual Rotten pumpkin award goes to Adraigs029 for his daring piece of structurally challenged koboldery. It's been unanimously found quite awful, but in a cheerful, heart-warming, dwarfy sort of way. The accompanying prize of two hundred barrels of rotgut beer can be picked up at the warehouse in the Maze of Gloves. Thank you"
I done made it myself, I did.
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thincake and flatcake and smallcake and minicake
however do they feel when the walls come down

jimjulius

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #38 on: February 17, 2015, 03:07:14 pm »

A dramatic poetic form intended to make an apology concerning war, originating in The Tan Empire. The poem is a single line. Use of internal rhyme is characteristic of the form. The poem has five feet with a syllable weight pattern of long-long (quantitative spondaic pentameter). The poem has a terminal caesura.

"War is a bore! Whore..."
« Last Edit: February 17, 2015, 03:10:40 pm by jimjulius »
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Spehss _

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #39 on: February 17, 2015, 03:24:12 pm »

Inspired by a post by Putnam the other day, I tried making a poem using the in-game dwarvish language included in the raws.

Spoiler: dwarvish (click to show/hide)

Spoiler: literal translation (click to show/hide)
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Steam ID: Spehss Cat
Turns out you can seriously not notice how deep into this shit you went until you get out.

Brightgalrs

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #40 on: February 17, 2015, 06:59:39 pm »

Urist okab kun.
Urist (will) break cat.
Can also be translated as:
Quote
Dagger (will) break cat.

It works on so many levels.
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Fwoosh

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #41 on: February 17, 2015, 10:47:52 pm »

Dwarven poetry? *shifty eyes* Well, I did write this little thing a couple years back.

Tholzagith: A Forgotten Tale (super long so mostly spoilered)

In the mountainous realm of the sturdy dwarves, there lay a fortress strong and fair.
Its walls were high and its mines were deep, and its halls were filled with song and drink.
But far below this mountainhome a terror roamed the darkened deeps.
To the mountain's roots the dwarves had delved, and forgotten beasts woke in their wake.
For a monstrous creature dwelt below, a twisted blend of man and beast.
As from its slumber it awoke, it heard the sounds of life and screeched.
Since the dawn of time it had slept alone, and now arose in rage and wrath.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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That Wolf

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #42 on: February 18, 2015, 03:09:00 am »

Words of a hermit fisherman

The lungfish does frighten me oh, if not for its size it be a dragons foe.
For laws true it does not care, you will see them land sea and air,
Their grip on my world does tighten so, these are the reasons im frightened bro.
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I am not afraid of an army of Warriors led by a Child; I am afraid of an army of Children led by a Warrior.

brg3386

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #43 on: February 18, 2015, 12:26:04 pm »

I based this somewhat off of one of the randomly generated poetic forms Toady posted. I followed it somewhat loosely.

>A ribald poetic form intended to describe religion, originating in The Nations of Holding. The poem is six tercets. Use of alliteration is characteristic of the form. Each line has eight syllables. The ending of every line of the poem rhymes with every other. The third line of each tercet must expand the idea of the first line.

This servant of Stozu greets you
The god of Fortresses and War
With his great aid, our foes were slew

In conflict, I look to the star
After battle, we all get brew
In war, I know you are not far

At their defenses, we break through
Parties afterwards at the bar
The bloody siege left very few

From that battle, I gained a scar
With Stozu with me, foes I'll hew
Enemies bodies, left to char

With this triumph, we start anew
Adversaries are not on par
Thanks to Stozu, we overthrew

That morning, my friends and I spar
That night we dine on beef and stew
In the dark, I look to that star
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bahihs

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Re: Dwarven poetry (bad is the new good)
« Reply #44 on: February 18, 2015, 07:37:16 pm »

I based this somewhat off of one of the randomly generated poetic forms Toady posted. I followed it somewhat loosely.

>A ribald poetic form intended to describe religion, originating in The Nations of Holding. The poem is six tercets. Use of alliteration is characteristic of the form. Each line has eight syllables. The ending of every line of the poem rhymes with every other. The third line of each tercet must expand the idea of the first line.

This servant of Stozu greets you
The god of Fortresses and War
With his great aid, our foes were slew

In conflict, I look to the star
After battle, we all get brew
In war, I know you are not far

At their defenses, we break through
Parties afterwards at the bar
The bloody siege left very few

From that battle, I gained a scar
With Stozu with me, foes I'll hew
Enemies bodies, left to char

With this triumph, we start anew
Adversaries are not on par
Thanks to Stozu, we overthrew

That morning, my friends and I spar
That night we dine on beef and stew
In the dark, I look to that star

7/10 Needs more alliteration and the third line(s) does not expand the idea of the first line(s). However, well done sticking to the rhyme and meter.
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