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Author Topic: PathoGen: Pandemic and Social Manipulation Simulator  (Read 1256 times)

IndigoFenix

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  • All things die, but nothing dies forever.
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    • Boundworlds: A Browser-Based Multiverse Creation and Exploration Game
PathoGen: Pandemic and Social Manipulation Simulator
« on: July 29, 2020, 04:45:06 am »

PathoGen

This is a program designed to simulate the progressive spread of multiple interacting "viral conditions" through a large population.

For example, it can model not only the exponential spread of a physical virus, but also the spread of ideas, beliefs and practices that can slow down - or accelerate - the transmission of that virus.

It can also be used to simulate the manipulation and influence of a population on a grand scale through the spread of ideas. You can simulate government actions and observe their impact on the population's behavior and condition.

Originally concieved during the 2020 Novel Coronavirus pandemic, the same mechanics can potentially be applied to a wide variety of societal, political, and epidemiological circumstances.

I probably won't focus too much on this (BoundWorlds is still my main project) but it seemed like a neat thing to make, so I made it.  I might add a few more game-like aspects to it (like resources and win/loss conditions); it's just a simulator right now.

Pathos is designed to be ultra-moddable.  There is no online distribution system right now, but you can create a scenario and download it as a text file, then upload it to run it.

As with all simulators, accurate results require accurate inputs.  Garbage in, garbage out.

This is not, right now, a COVID-19 simulator, since the numbers are wrong.  But if you put in the correct numbers, and correctly account for all complexities, it should model things fairly accurately.  However, if you add too many variables, it can cause slowdown, since every possible combination of symptoms must be tracked independently.