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Author Topic: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry  (Read 244893 times)

Iduno

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4140 on: June 24, 2019, 08:17:20 am »

Moved from other thread that no longer exists:

I mentioned in another thread the twice-baked potato balls that I enjoy making. I'm lactose intolerant, so I don't make them unless I can feed other people also (leftovers become a problem, as does overindulging). The name is terrible, because you only bake the potatoes once (or steam or boil them). Also, you only use enough potato to hold the dairy and flavorings together.

Years ago, I was looking through a website called "this is why you're fat", which contained all manner of unnecessary foods. Several of them were more interesting looking than in practice (hamburger with a donut bun), but there were a lot I'd be willing to eat. So I tried copying these from a picture.

Mash up some potatoes while they're still warm. Boiled, steamed, baked, whatever. You'll need some liquid, so sour cream and melted butter are good. Peels can stay on or come off, but they've got a lot of nutrients.

Once, the potatoes are mixed, grate cheese into the bowl with the potatoes. I use a cheddar, so I know when I have enough: the mixture turns yellow-orange. You may need to add more butter and sour cream to get it to mix in. Also add in bacon, green onion, and other flavorings (garlic?) you like. So far, mostly the same as making a good twice baked potato, without needing to hollow out the skin. Then you roll the cooled potato mixture into balls. They should be a bit sticky. Roll the balls in flour, then an eggwash, then crumbs. That'll give you a thicker crispy coating, and also keep the ball from falling apart when it heats up. Hopefully your oil is hot, because you want it to get good and browned on the outside. Let them cool on a paper towel to get rid of the excess oil, and eat as soon as they're cool enough not to burn you. The crust may break if you aren't careful picking them up; the inside should be a nearly-liquid cheese and sour cream mixture (with potato).

You'll probably be making a few at a time, so hopefully you've got time.
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nenjin

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4141 on: June 24, 2019, 10:00:30 am »

I was totally wondering why this thread got locked. (*insert food related pun here*)
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smjjames

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4142 on: June 24, 2019, 10:01:25 am »

I was totally wondering why this thread got locked. (*insert food related pun here*)

We kind of all were.
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Yoink

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4143 on: June 24, 2019, 11:48:42 am »

Glad this is finally unlocked, haha. At first I thought OP must have thought discussion was getting too heated and wanted us to simmer down.




My Food news: just made myself a freakin' lovely cup of Nesquik. Nailed the consistency and the flavour. Mm-mmmm.   
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Mephisto

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4144 on: June 24, 2019, 12:01:48 pm »

I think I might like food too much. Half of last night's dinner was an amazing pot roast. The meat package said it contained enough for 4-6 people. Then I added veggies and seasonings on top of that. My wife and I ate most of it last night, with enough left over for a light lunch today.
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Kagus

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4145 on: June 24, 2019, 01:13:06 pm »

I made about... I think somewhere on the order of 6+ kg of food for the housewarming party on Saturday.

I'm still struggling with the leftovers, and I've been handing out wrapped lunches to friends to try and get rid of it all.

Frumple

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4146 on: June 24, 2019, 05:50:57 pm »

I'm becoming increasingly reminded that potato chips (and similar things) in rice is pretty awesome. Tonight's supper is brown rice, with noodle seasoning*, cheese, shredded up honey roasted turkey, and the remainder of a mixed bag of black pepper potato chips and white chedder cheese crackers. It's disturbingly tasty, and it's the chips that take it to the next level.

* Take maruchan yakisoba seasoning packets, two packs teriyaki beef and one pack spicy chicken, empty into a small container (ziplock bag, whatever), then shake well. Apply fairly sparingly, it's decently strong. Does wonderful things to most grains and soups.
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Iduno

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4147 on: Today at 07:54:28 am »

I'm becoming increasingly reminded that potato chips (and similar things) in rice is pretty awesome. Tonight's supper is brown rice, with noodle seasoning*, cheese, shredded up honey roasted turkey, and the remainder of a mixed bag of black pepper potato chips and white chedder cheese crackers. It's disturbingly tasty, and it's the chips that take it to the next level.

* Take maruchan yakisoba seasoning packets, two packs teriyaki beef and one pack spicy chicken, empty into a small container (ziplock bag, whatever), then shake well. Apply fairly sparingly, it's decently strong. Does wonderful things to most grains and soups.

Sounds so salty (although starch like rice or potato can handle a lot of salt), but also pretty good. I agree the combination of rice and crunch is good. I assume that's why so many people/cultures have a thing for the bits of rice that harden along the edges while you cook it.

I think I'll probably be cooking in my Grandma's kitchen this weekend, so I'm thinking of making pecan pie; which I learned to make because of her. Hopefully there are still one or two of her small aluminum pie tins to make a pie with the scraps like she always did when I was young. Much better than throwing them away, and you're okay with leaning a bit more towards making too much instead of too little.
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penguinofhonor

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4148 on: Today at 10:09:07 am »

Apologies again for the lock. I must have misclicked while reading the thread a while back (probably on my phone) and since I don't check the forums as often as I used to, I didn't catch it before it fell off the front page. Feel free to PM me if anything similar happens in the future.
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Frumple

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Re: Food Thread: Kitchen Chemistry
« Reply #4149 on: Today at 12:24:55 pm »

I'm becoming increasingly reminded that potato chips (and similar things) in rice is pretty awesome. Tonight's supper is brown rice, with noodle seasoning*, cheese, shredded up honey roasted turkey, and the remainder of a mixed bag of black pepper potato chips and white chedder cheese crackers. It's disturbingly tasty, and it's the chips that take it to the next level.

* Take maruchan yakisoba seasoning packets, two packs teriyaki beef and one pack spicy chicken, empty into a small container (ziplock bag, whatever), then shake well. Apply fairly sparingly, it's decently strong. Does wonderful things to most grains and soups.
Sounds so salty (although starch like rice or potato can handle a lot of salt), but also pretty good. I agree the combination of rice and crunch is good. I assume that's why so many people/cultures have a thing for the bits of rice that harden along the edges while you cook it.
It's not too bad on the salt front so long as you go easy on the seasoning (something like a third or forth of a packet's worth is usually plenty for a decent sized bowl of whatever, maybe even less) and don't have too much chips, really. It's there, but it's a good bit less than cup ramen or something.

If I had to offhand guess amounts without actually having the info in front of me, I'd probably guesstimate somewhere in the 4-500 <whatever that standard unit is> range? Maybe six, less than eight. Ramen ranges up to like the 1800s, heh.
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