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Author Topic: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2  (Read 9839 times)

Fishbreath

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Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« on: December 22, 2019, 02:15:48 pm »

The nights are long, it's cold outside, and I'm almost done with my Christmas choir obligations, so it's time for some winter wargaming.

This year's selection is Rule the Waves 2. We'll be playing France, for its interesting position astride the border between Europe (where Germany and Britain vie for naval supremacy) and the Mediterranean (where there are a bunch of second-rate powers to beat up on), and the chip on its shoulder in re: Britain and naval matters.

I like to do some audience participation in these, so I'll bold occasional decision points throughout posts.

My plan is to post one update a week, each covering about two years of game time, which means a full game (from 1900 to 1955) will take us into summer. I'll aim to have the updates posted on Thursday, so I can play a little over the weekend and write in the evenings thereafter.

[ed. I'm writing these in Markdown and have to convert them to bbcode for Bay12, so I may be a bit behind getting them posted here.]

Vive la France!

In Rule the Waves 2, France has neither serious perks nor serious drawbacks. We do get two bonus techs (Hardened AP penetrator, which just finished researching, and Quadruple Turrets, which is a decade or two down the road—bonus tech just means we have a good chance of getting it early). Our budget ranks third or fourth, after Britain, Germany, and sometimes the US. We have a moderate budgetary edge over the Italians (but more overseas colonies where we'll have to station creaking, dilapidated armored cruisers years past their best-by date), and a serious edge over the creaking, dilapidated Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Looking north, we come to the Germans, among our historical foes, and the English, also among our historical foes. In the real-world timeline, England began making overtures to France not long after the present game date, as a way to counterbalance Germany. An alliance north of France, one way or another, might keep us safe from the other party, but might also drag us into wars we don't really want.

I guess Russia is also up there, but in a game about naval warfare, European Russia might as well be on the moon. (In the real-world timeline, France and Russia are allied, so they aren't among the six opponents the game chooses to simulate for us.)

Looking west, we have the United States. We don't have any reason to mess with them, and the only place where we have the bases to plausibly do so is Southeast Asia.

Speaking of which, looking east, we have Southeast Asia, where we're a major player. Japan is an obvious threat out that way, given that Southeast Asia is their backyard. The Americans, who hold the Philippines, also have interests out there.

Time for the first decision. Where do we focus our strategic interests? In the Mediterranean is my preference, but I could also see convincing arguments for expanding our presence in Africa or the Far East. Relatedly, how hawkish should we be? In Rule the Waves as in real life, it's much easier to get money appropriated for the Navy when using it is in the cards, but actually having to use it means we might lose parts of it, and if the part of the

Before I get too far ahead of myself, though, let's take a look at our starting fleet, custom-built according to the theory that France has historically produced some unusual warships.





If you don't want to zoom in on that, it's four battleships of the La République class, four armored cruisers of the Gueydon class, five light cruisers of the Tage class, and 16(ish?) destroyers of the Fauconneau class in active service. Under construction, we have another La République, another Gueydon, three Tages, and two Fauconneaus.

Because our ships are built nearly to the limits of our dockyards' capabilities, we have fewer of them than other nations. We have four battleships, while Italy has seven, Britain has nine, and the Germans have 10 with another four under construction. Our four armored cruisers put us ahead of the Italians, but we lag them in light cruisers and destroyers, although the Tages under construction will change that.

The Austro-Hungarians have less than half the battleship tonnage we do.



The La Républiques (Les Républiques?) are fast by the standard of pre-dreadnoughts, at a design speed of 20 knots, and well-armed with 13-inch guns. That's enough to outrun and outshoot their historical British counterparts in the Duncan class, although they give up a bit in terms of armor.



The Gueydons are oddball ships. They're relatively fast at 23 knots, and their range and internal accommodations support colonial operations. They have about the armor you would expect for the class and era. The strange part is the gun layout. Rather than the usual four 9" or 10" guns and broadside casemate 5" or 6" guns, they have an all-medium-gun layout: twelve 7" guns in six double turrets, with a broadside of 8 guns and a fore or aft throw of 6. They also feature three torpedo tubes underwater.

Time will tell if the unusual armament layout is a success or a failure.



The Tages are also strange, with turreted 5" guns fore and aft, and broadside 4" guns in casemates, along with torpedo tubes. They're lightly armored, and only slightly faster than the Gueydons at 24 knots. (That's still faster than contemporary light cruisers, though.) Their armament is a bit lighter than their peers', but their armor is heavier.



The first and only one of our starting ship classes which is notably slower than its contemporaries, the Fauconneaus make up for it with a few extra torpedo launchers.

Decision point #2: where do we focus our shipbuilding efforts? Is France to build a mighty battleship fleet to crush the Italians and the Austro-Hungarians? Should we focus on cruisers to scour the trade lanes in the event of war? Are submarines, destroyers, and torpedoes worth our time? Is there anything in particular we ought to build right now, or should be build a nest egg for when research begins to pay off? Bear in mind, building a battleship is about a two-year endeavor.

That decision also influences our research priorities. Should we change any of them for now?



Finally, finances and diplomacy. Tensions are low right now, and our budget is in near-perfect balance. At 6%, our research spending is a little low. It might be wise to increase that, as ships come off the ways and money becomes available.



That's all for this first update. This being Christmas week, I'll plan to do the next update the first Thursday in 2020.

Knave

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2019, 10:25:12 am »

ahhh RTW2 is a great game.

PTW for sure!

As for decisions, happy to see where you take things either way. Beating on AH early might be fun, but the Gueydons looks like a fun ship to try and grab colonial possessions too if we get the chance :)
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Karlito

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2019, 11:23:48 am »

Those fast cruisers at game start certainly make things interesting. Typically the AI will be spurred to build things that match that speed, so maybe it's better to strike early while we can use that advantage.

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Hanzoku

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2019, 01:46:50 pm »

Strategic Interests: Focus on bullying the Mediterranean powers into submission, let Britain and Germany focus on each other.

Hawkish: Glory to France! The Navy will dominate the seas and allow the Army to invade their territories.

Shipbuilding: Continuous dockyard expansion at all times until our yards can build 45kton dreadnoughts and battlecruisers. Keep a battleship in production, but focus heavily on light cruisers and destroyers as most all battles are skirmishes where the ships of the line are never involved. (At least if this is anything like the first.)

Build and keep 20 subs in service, they provide slow and steady VP during wars by sinking merchant shipping.

Oh, and max out research budget, we’ll field designs generations ahead of our foes!
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EuchreJack

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2019, 03:12:48 pm »

I'm really pissed that the Rule the Waves 2 forum hasn't pinned the wiki.  The Technology page, required reading that stuff is.

Based upon that, set "Ship Design" and "Turrets and gun Mountings" at High Priority.  Also agree with max research.

Since you mentioned being down on battleships, get another one going.  Plan on building a new one each year as research unlocks more Dreadnought-like vessels.  Fortunately, that speed and armament means your pre-dreadnoughts will be useful for a lot longer than most other designs.  The argument could even be made that you could skip the semi-dreadnoughts entirely.

I hate your armored cruisers, but they should be decent for colonial protection.  I predict they'll all get sunk by torpedoes.  Armored cruisers suck as a class anyways, so its not a big deal.  They're expensive, never build any more.  But they should convert well into Aircraft Carriers.

Those destroyers are a lot better than what I usually see the AI make.  I'm used to the 1-2 torpedo tubes, and your ships have 4.  And they're NOT cramped or short range.  Crank those out and sprinkle them everywhere!

If you want to design a ship (and who doesn't?), then you might look at either a cheap light cruiser design for convoy raiding (aka expendable cheap) or a gunboat for colonial service.

EDIT: Could we see the intelligence report comparison of the countries?  I'm worried your forces won't be able to cover both the Mediterranean and Atlantic.  While I'd rather not clog up your LP with my ultra-cheap theories, you might at least need a semi-cheap Heavy Cruiser for parity reasons.  Cramped, Short range, 4 x 10" guns, the barest minimum of armor to call it a Heavy Cruiser, 20 knots, 2 torpedoes, minimum lighter guns not to pop up an error (4 x 6" casemated?).

EDIT2: Actually, you're paying a heavy price for the Long Range, Colonial Service combo.  I could create a much better and cheaper ship without just those two options.  Either ignore the Heavy Cruiser class entirely, or you'll need a new one.  I'd actually suggest scrapping at least one, as they're overkill for your current colonial service needs.  You can use the money from scrapping and not maintaining for actual warships.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2019, 05:23:35 pm by EuchreJack »
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King Zultan

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2019, 06:32:01 am »

PTW
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NickAragua

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2019, 11:19:31 am »

I have no idea how this game works, but looks fun. [insert obligatory french military joke here]
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Blaze

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2019, 11:42:54 pm »

Was actually hoping someone would do an LP of this.

All aboard the Dunk-boats.
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EuchreJack

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2019, 12:27:12 am »

I have no idea how this game works, but looks fun. [insert obligatory french military joke here]

Maximize the cannons facing backwards!
No wonder they have such a high speed!
Name your next ship "Break here to make German Tanks"!

...
But seriously, you should ally with the Americans and beat the British.  That is also historical French military.  And also almost take over the world.  They did that too.
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Blastbeard

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2019, 01:55:26 am »

I don't know the first thing about this game either, but the screenshots give me the impression that it's like Aurora, but with better graphics.

I know just slightly more about naval strategy than I do about this game, little enough that I can sum it up with "No smoking near the magazine" and "Don't build the Bismarck unless you can afford to build twenty more".

I'm biased towards smaller ships in these kinds of games, because I prefer having a hundred guns that might kill the enemy I can put in a hundred different places over one gun that will definitely kill the enemy that can only be in one place at a time. If this were Stellaris, I'd be the guy throwing 200k stacks of corvettes at your titan until it dies or your PC melts.
However, between the micromanagement and hardware requirements to get the most out of it, in addition to whatever else this game throws in, mass producing what amounts to a T-34 with water wings and throwing them at dreadnoughts by the hundreds may not be the best course of action. Or maybe that's what peak performance looks like, I wouldn't know because this thread was my first indication this game exists.

What I do know is that if the Suez Canal is in the game, then it is definitely worth fighting a war over. Getting to asia from europe by boat really, really sucks, so locking down a shortcut will be a major boon to both your strategy and mental health. Even if you can't control it personally, at least consider parking some assets nearby, both to inform people you don't like that their mothers were hamsters and their fathers smelt of elderberries as they attempt to use it, and to prevent the same from happening to you.
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Fishbreath

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2019, 09:55:08 am »

Quote from: Blastbeard
I'm biased towards smaller ships in these kinds of games, because I prefer having a hundred guns that might kill the enemy I can put in a hundred different places over one gun that will definitely kill the enemy that can only be in one place at a time. If this were Stellaris, I'd be the guy throwing 200k stacks of corvettes at your titan until it dies or your PC melts.

In this game, that's torpedoes, whether on destroyers, light cruisers, or (on the strategic map) submarines. Light guns are insufficient to stop battleships—the penetration/armor math just doesn't work out.

The Suez Canal is in the game. Whoever owns the Egypt territory controls it (so, right now, the British, who would crush us).

Haspen

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2019, 02:10:47 pm »

I have no idea what this all means, I mean, the numbers on the windows.

PTW anyways!
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EuchreJack

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2019, 02:41:47 pm »

Quote from: Blastbeard
I'm biased towards smaller ships in these kinds of games, because I prefer having a hundred guns that might kill the enemy I can put in a hundred different places over one gun that will definitely kill the enemy that can only be in one place at a time. If this were Stellaris, I'd be the guy throwing 200k stacks of corvettes at your titan until it dies or your PC melts.

In this game, that's torpedoes, whether on destroyers, light cruisers, or (on the strategic map) submarines. Light guns are insufficient to stop battleships—the penetration/armor math just doesn't work out.

The Suez Canal is in the game. Whoever owns the Egypt territory controls it (so, right now, the British, who would crush us).

Which is why I'm so impressed by the destroyers that were generated for the starting navy.  They're a good swarm vessel.  Just for fun, compare the bottom line of the destroyer to the battleship.
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Fishbreath

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2020, 10:03:35 am »

Before diving into the month-by-month update structure to which Rule the Waves 2 lends itself, I realized based on some comments last week that I haven't explained what Rule the Waves 2 is.

Rule the Waves 2 is a strategy wargame which covers, in roughly equal parts, the design and development of warships between 1900 and 1955, and battles using those ships. The two most important parts of the game are the ship design screen (which you've seen a few times already in the first entry in this series, and which you will see twice more today) and the battle interface (which has not yet come up). The strategic layer which glues the two together is primarily there to create reasons to design ships and to start wars in which the ships get used.

That's pretty much the long and short of it. The game advances in one-month turns; battles play out in one-minute real-time simulation steps.

June 1900

Back to the game. Two fresh destroyers come down the ways, and our spies uncover details on a new class of Italian armored cruiser. Not much to worry about.

Much slower and much lighter than ours.

August 1900

Unlike historical France, this is not a democracy, but the weight of public opinion nevertheless leans toward bullying the Mediterranean. Another fellow is doing a Rule the Waves France playthrough right now, and is also bullying the Mediterranean. It seems to be working, but I also hate to be a copycat. I think we'll keep our eye mainly on the Mediterranean, but we won't disdain the chance to expand in Southeast Asia if it falls before us. (At the behest of a blog commenter—I'm running this in three places with three relatively active audiences, if I hadn't mentioned that already.)

With an eye toward Mediterranean domination, the bulk of the navy moves to Marseilles. A squadron of destroyers stays on the northern coast.

October 1900

October sees a handy event. The Prime Minister makes a gaffe, so we exploit it for more money. This has the side effect of bringing war with Italy nearer, but with the increased budget, I order another Tage-class and push our research spending to the maximum permissible 12%. Worth it.

December 1900

A new government decides to raise expenditures on armaments. That's good news for us. We lay down a new La République, to be named Suffren.

January 1901

The Gueydon-class cruiser Bruix enters service. Replacing her on the build list is one light cruiser and three destroyers.

Light cruisers are particularly important elements of the fleet. They serve as our eyes in fleet battles, typically deployed in an umbrella ahead of the battle line. Given the speed of our battleships and the size of their guns, holding our preferred range is important, and a robust scouting force of fast light cruisers will let us do that.

February 1901

Parliament votes to cut naval spending, upending our carefully-planned budget. We have enough of a cushion to run a deficit until some ships finish building, however, so that's what we'll do.

March 1901



A breakthrough in ship design! We can now build semi-dreadnoughts, ships with secondary batteries not dramatically smaller than their primary batteries.

That brings us into approximately the semi-dreadnought era. Pre-dreadnought battleships, with a small battery of heavy guns and a larger battery of quick-firing medium ones ones, were predicated on the idea that naval gunnery at long ranges was not possible. You had your big guns to punch through heavy armor, and a good number of smaller guns to wreck your target's upper works and superstructure as the range closed, keeping up a high rate of fire.

Early on in the 20th century, advancements in rangefinding and fire control proved that this was not the case. Since your big guns could hit targets at long range, it made less and less sense to carry a lot of middleweight guns when you could instead spend that weight on your heavy ones, and deliver knockout blows from further away from your enemies. This update to the received wisdom on shipbuilding ultimately produced the dreadnought battleship.

The technological capability to build ships with, say, three centerline turrets with 12" guns existed in 1900, but doctrine had not yet caught up. While most of the technologies we'll develop in Rule the Waves are actually technological advancements, some (in particular, in the Ship Design tree) represent the development of new ways of thinking. We, as players with some historical knowledge, know that the dreadnought battleship is the way of the future, but our 1901-era French have not yet hit upon that idea, so the game sticks some limits on us to force us to stay in character.

April 1901

Spies report that the Italians have also figured out the heavy secondary battery. We're keeping an eye on their shipbuilding, but they haven't laid down any new battleships just yet. It appears they're focusing on their wimpy armored cruisers.

May 1901

More intelligence reports from Italy: they'll be commissioning a new light cruiser just after the New Year, and their current light cruiser class has a speed of 21 knots and belt armor of two inches. Their armor is heavier than our light cruisers', but they can barely outrun our battleships, and our armored cruisers could easily run them down and have a massive firepower advantage.

Our Gueydons slot into the hierarchy of naval warfare right around where battlecruisers do a decade later. Battlecruisers made armored cruisers obsolete, by dint of their higher speed and heavy main armament—a battlecruiser could easily catch and outshoot an armored cruiser, and could easily outrun a battleship (whose armor tilts the fight in favor of itself).

The Gueydons to light cruisers are like battlecruisers will be to armored cruisers, in that they're excellent light cruiser hunters—faster than other armored cruisers with heavier guns, faster than most light cruisers, and much more heavily armed. Too, as someone pointed out, they'll make great experimental aircraft carriers someday.

One year in, the Italians have nearly caught up to us in naval budget. We're closing the battleship gap, but won't have our sixth ship until 1903. They're building more armored cruisers, but ours are heavier.

June 1901

We may not get the chance to catch up, though. Italy looks to be making waves in Greece.



The Italians back down, but tensions rise.

July 1901

With tensions between France and Italy running high, we skip hosting an international regatta in favor of keeping the budget focused on shipbuilding.

The Italians raise their naval budget again.

August 1901

We catch a German spy. I briefly debate using the occasion to push for a higher budget, but decide instead to sweep it under the rug. Tangling with Germany would be unpleasant.

September 1901

A disarmament conference in the Hague ends with no concrete results, to my satisfaction.

October 1901

One light cruiser and three destroyers enter service.

We send a force to quell an uprising in China, which increases tension, but also raises the prestige of the French Navy.

One concrete suggestion from a reader was a cheaper (that is, expendable) class of light cruiser for commerce raiding. Enter the Chateaurenault class:



At 2800 tons, it's a little more than half the displacement of our Tages. It doesn't sacrifice much speed—at 23 knots, it's still one of the faster light cruisers in current production, at least that I'm aware of—but has lighter armament and armor. It's much cheaper than the Tages, too, so we can bulk out our fleet of light cruisers more quickly.

December 1901



Thanks to the newspapers, we get a little budget bump. Design studies on the Chateaurenault class are finished, so we order two with some of our current excess.

January 1902



Spies recently dispatched to America to see what one of the big-spender naval powers is up to bore their first fruit this month, giving us a blueprint for an American armored cruiser of the San Diego class. It isn't much to write home about. The Gueydons remain clearly superior in weaponry, speed, and armor, as you might expect from ships with an extra 5,000 tons displacement or so.

It's a good month for the French intelligence services generally. We hear that the Americans are building a Raleigh-class light cruiser with 3" main guns, outmatched by even our cheap light cruisers. Austria-Hungary has commissioned two armored cruisers this month, and Italy has improved its armor-piercing shells.

February 1902



Spies recently dispatched to America now bear negative fruit. One of them gets caught.

As a consolation prize, we invent a number of new technologies this month, reducing the weight of our ship's hulls and machinery and allowing us to build ships with secondary batteries in double turrets. Ocean, a La République, is coming off the ways in three months. I smell a new battleship design to take her place.

March 1902

The Japanese wish to buy a technology from us. I decide to sell it, given that we'll shortly be paying the design expenses on a new battleship design.

Well, since we are paying the design expenses on a new battleship design.



The Trident-class battleship features the same four-gun 13" main battery as the older Les Républiques, backed by a pair of two-gun 12" wing turrets in the secondary battery. 12 4" guns in turrets provide defense against small craft. Their armor protects them against their own guns between at least 5,000 and 9,000 yards, and possibly further out or in depending on gun data at those ranges.

Finally, they have a 22-knot speed, practically unheard-of in this era. Even the real-world HMS Dreadnought, still four years off, only managed 21, and that was with turbines rather than the triple-expansion engines we're rocking.

Anyway, the upshot is that sufficiently fast heavy ships render armored cruisers obsolete, so there's no real reason to build more Gueydons.

That brings us to a decision point. The Tridents are the largest ships we can build in our current docks. Should we focus on building a shipyard expansion or two over the next two years, building one Trident at a time, or build out the fleet more quickly by building two Tridents at once? A shipyard expansion costs 2,000 per month, I believe, so at this point in our game history, it's just about equivalent to one battleship.

April 1902

Just as we prepare to render the armored cruiser obsolete, the monthly intelligence report indicates that Austria-Hungary, Great Britain, Japan, and Italy have either laid down or commissioned armored cruisers this month. Our spies in America steal the blueprints for another San Diego-class, which is of limited use to us given that we saw the same blueprint in January.

May 1902

The La République-class battleship Ocean is commissioned. One year from today, the last La République, Suffren, will join the fleet. Next month, the design studies on the Trident type will finish, and we can start producing one of those.

French researchers have developed reliable bursting charges, which will enhance the damage of penetrating hits. A trade mission to Great Britain yields important results: we developed the technology to build coastal submarines. Finally, we learned how to make 600-ton destroyers. A new design there will be in the offing early in the next entry. Speaking of, should we spend our small-ships budget on new destroyers or on some submarines? The coastal submarine design will work well for us, given our focus on the Mediterranean; each submarine costs a little more than half as much per month as the Fauconneau destroyers do (although the Fauconneaus are cheaper in absolute terms, taking fewer months to build).

The intelligence report is very busy this month: Germany commissions a pair of destroyers and a pair of battleships, Great Britain is concerned about its naval superiority and has increased its spending. (That's their national special ability. Ours? Our government frequently changes its mind on fleet priorities. C'est la vie...) Italy has laid down a pair of light cruisers, but between what we have in service and what we have under construction, we still have a better light cruiser fleet.

Japan has at least two classes of armored cruiser in progress right now, one with 10" main guns and another with a 20-knot speed and a 5" armor belt, both of which are entirely outclassed by even our existing battleships, to say nothing of our future designs.

Two-Year Report: Diplomacy



Tensions continue to run high with Italy, our most likely foe in the next few years. Despite our efforts, the Austro-Hungarians continue to view us as friends.

Britain and Germany, the two do-not-touch powers, aren't our biggest fans, but also don't seem to have much motivation to come after us.

Two-Year Report: The Fleet



Here are the Mediterranean Current Naval Tonnage and Planned Naval Tonnage Rankings. Italy has about a battleship's lead over us presently in the latter category, with the situation flipped in the former.

Current: 1. FR 190,700 2. IT 179,600 3. AH 128,600

Planned: 1. IT 238,300 2. FR 222,100 3. AH 164,100

Italy still holds a lead in battleship tonnage, and will continue to do so until at least one Trident enters service (which is two years and five months out from when we lay the first one down).

Their lead in the Planned Naval Tonnage category stems from a heavy investment in armored cruisers, to match the Austro-Hungarian plan. Should we could consider a class of inexpensive armored cruisers to match them? Compared to a Trident (which takes 29 months to build and costs about 2100 funds per month), a hypothetical 22-knot cruiser with 9" main guns, a 5.5" belt, and a turreted 5" secondary battery would take 22 months to build and cost about 1,500 funds per month. That's a little more than our current class of large light cruisers per month, and five months longer. These cruisers would be armed slightly below the standard of their peers, but armored similarly, and would have a speed advantage of a knot or two. I lean against the idea, myself, given that we have a fast class of battleship and a light cruiser class suitable for commerce raiding, but I figured I'd put it on the table.

Under construction right now, we have one La République, which will be finished in 11 months, a pair of Tages, which will finish between one and four months from now, and a pair of Chateaurenaults, which are about a year away, in addition to a single Fauconneau.

Our current budget surplus is 2,120 funds per month, which will be put into a Trident as soon as the design study finishes next month. Out of our total budget of 15,100 per month, maintenance on the fleet costs us 4,652 and construction costs us 6,315.

Don't forget, when answering, that shipyard expansions are also on the table as options for spending our money.

Haspen

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Re: Vive la France: Let's Play Rule the Waves 2
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2020, 11:24:29 am »

Senator Chapeau, that being moi simple persona, votes against shipyard expansions, but I guess it couldn't hurt having some more variety in our armored cruiser classes ;v
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